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Smoking and Smoking Cessation in Women
J Korean Soc Res Nicotine Tob 2022; 13(2): 35-42
Published online June 30, 2022
© 2022 The Korean Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

Sang Keun Hahm1, Hyeon Suk Kim2*, Eon Sook Lee3

1Department of Family Medicine, Hanil General Hospital, Seoul, 2College of Nursing, Shinhan University, Uijeongbu, 3Department of Family Medicine, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Goyang, Korea
Correspondence to: 源쁽닕
떊븳븰援 媛꾪샇븰
E-mail: september7777@hanmail.net
ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5412-0188
Received June 7, 2022; Revised June 29, 2022; Accepted June 29, 2022.
This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, dis-tribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
The age-standardized prevalence of daily tobacco smoking decreased in several decades in both genders, but with a steeper decline in women. Worldwide reports showed that women tend to use cigarettes at lower rates than men. However, the reports also showed an increased prevalence of tobacco use in young women, especially in Asian countries, which was because of women-targeted advertising by the tobacco industry. Women are at a higher risk of smoking-associated diseases such as lung cancer or chronic obstructive lung disease, apart from the health effect of second-hand smoking. Recent reports have shown that the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in women has been steadily increasing for several decades. Ample research suggests that there is a gender difference in the nicotine reward pathways, physiology, and psychological effect of smoking. Women are known to experience a stronger craving than men. There is a gender difference in a reason to smoke such as reinforcing effects of nicotine for men and negative mood for women. These differences contribute to the overall lower cessation rate for women. Nicotine replacement therapy additionally is less effective for smoking cessation in women than men. However, varenicline has greater short-term efficacy in women. This study shows the gender difference in smoking and cessation, which suggested that health professionals, governments, and policy-makers should take action on creating a smoking cessation policy for women.
Keywords : Woman; Smoking; Smoking cessation; Nicotine depence
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