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Associations between the Smoking Status of Korean Employees and Their Work Schedule & Working Hours
J Korean Soc Res Nicotine Tob 2019; 10(2): 99-105
Published online December 15, 2019
© 2019 The Korean Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

Ju-Ok Son, In-Sun Kang, Hong-Jun Cho*

Department of Family Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: *議고솉以
슱궛븰援 쓽怨쇰븰 꽌슱븘궛蹂묒썝 媛젙쓽븰怨
E-mail: hjcho@amc.seoul.kr
ORDID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5358-6549
Received June 12, 2019; Revised September 16, 2019; Accepted October 4, 2019.
This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, dis-tribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Introduction: Work schedules and working hours are known to affect the incidence of cancer, heart disease, and cardiovascular disease and are associated with unhealthy behaviors. This study evaluated the association between smoking rates in Korean adult workers and their work schedules and working hours.
Methods: The analysis included data of 15,904 workers aged 돟19 years obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2013–2017). The work schedule was categorized as day, evening, night, or shift work, and the working hours per week as 돞40 h, 40–50 h, 50–60 h, or >60 h. Associations were assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis.
Results: Current smokers accounted for 27.4% of the included subjects. Women who worked in the evening or at night had significantly higher smoking rates than those who worked during the day [evening work: odds ratio (OR), 1.797; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.306–2.471; night work: OR, 6.835; 95% CI, 4.075–11.461]. Smoking rates were significantly higher in both men and women who worked >60 h per week (men: OR, 1.328; 95% CI, 1.117–1.578; women: OR, 1.835; 95% CI, 1.247–2.701).
Conclusion: The work schedule and working hours of adult workers in Korea influenced their smoking rates. Tobacco control policies for employees should consider the employees' work schedules and working hours.
Keywords : Night work; Shift work; Working hours; Smoking
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