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Correlation of Past Smoking Behaviors and Duration of Smoking Cessation with High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein Among Past Smokers in Korean Male Adults : Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
J Korean Soc Res Nicotine Tob 2018; 9(2): 71-79
Published online December 15, 2018
© 2018 The Korean Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

Yong Ho Sohn, Sang-keun Hahm*, Jin-ah Park, Min Woo Shin, Eun-hye Yoo, Ji-young Jung, Min-seok Oh, Seung-joo Lee, Jae-hyung Rhim

Department of Family Medicine, Hanil General Hospital, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: 븿긽洹
븳씪蹂묒썝 媛젙쓽븰怨 꽌슱떆 룄遊됯뎄 슦씠泥쒕줈 308 (슦) 01450
Tel: 02-901-3169 Fax: 02-901-3164 E-mail: 03580212@hanilmed.net
Received July 24, 2018; Revised August 29, 2018; Accepted October 5, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) can be used to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have demonstrated the relationship between cigarette smoking and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) elevation. However, the effects of smoking cessation on hs-CRP have not been evaluated in Korean male adults.
Methods: Based on the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 2015-2016, self-reported former smokers were selected. Participants with laboratory test results suggesting acute inflammation or any history of conditions that could elevate CRP levels were excluded. The frequency of hs-CRP elevation was compared between groups with various past smoking behaviors and duration of smoking cessation.
Results: The total number of selected participants was 1,243. Participants with larger cumulative smoking amount (P=0.026) or shorter duration of smoking cessation (P=0.024) tended to have significantly higher frequency of hs-CRP elevation. By logistic regression analysis, larger cumulative smoking amount have shown higher probability of hs-CRP elevation than smaller amount, but with no statistical significance. Long-term (竊10 years) and mid-term (5-10 years) cessation have shown lower probability of hs-CRP elevation than short-term (竊5 years), with statistical significance only between short-term and long-term cessation (odds ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.41-0.98, P=0.038).
Conclusion: Among past smokers in Korean male adults, the frequency of hs-CRP level elevation tended to be higher with larger cumulative smoking amount or shorter duration of smoking cessation. The risk of hs-CRP elevation was significantly lower with long-term smoking cessation than short-term cessation.
Keywords : Smoking cessation; C-reactive protein; Cardiovascular disease; Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
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